Review of ‘Subject 375’ by Nikki Owen

I received a copy of Subject 375 through NetGalley following my receipt of the sequel, The Killing Files (obviously had to read the first in the series before the second!) The plot sounded intriguing and slightly different to an average crime thriller, and I was definitely right about that!

Below is my review, plus a sneaky peak at the front cover and description and places to buy:

About The Book

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‘Subject 375’ by Nikki Owen

Plastic surgeon Dr Maria Martinez has Asperger’s. Convicted of killing a priest, she is alone, in prison and has no memory of the murder.

DNA evidence places Maria at the scene of the crime, yet she claims she’s innocent. Then she starts to remember… 

A strange room. Strange people. Being watched. 

As Maria gets closer to the truth she is drawn into a web of international intrigue and must fight not only to clear her name but to remain alive.

My Review

Subject 375, also known as The Spider In The Corner Of The Room, is a crime thriller following Maria Martinez as she starts to uncover who she truly is and why she has been accused of a murder she doesn’t remember committing. Slowly, as the storyline develops, we discover there are plenty of secrets being kept from her, and that has been the case for her whole life. Soon enough, everything is is revealed and Maria has to fight against the world’s biggest national intelligence agencies to stay alive. There was no way any of this could have been predicted, as a reader, which made it all the more exciting with an incredible climactic ending. It was fast paced in parts, but sometimes the plot was difficult to follow, but all threads tied up in the end.

It was very easy to like Maria as the main female protagonist in the book, as she was the one being targeted and at her most vulnerable being in a new environment, prison of all places! I could feel sympathetic towards her as shocking facts were uncovered about her life. Harry and Malthus were also likeable characters, but it was not until later in the book that I started to feel less uneasy about who they might be and who’s side they were on. The character’s definitely felt real to me, all of them being well developed with their own backstory, however small their role was in the book.

The plot was written in such a skilled way, with flashbacks dotted about, and the past and present tenses coming together at the end so we could understand the chronology of the story. This method of writing is great for keeping the reader guessing as, when something happens in one tense but then switches to another on a cliffhanger, it keeps us engaged and wanting find out more, which continues to happen each time the tense changes. My favourite part of the book was when the two tenses came together and I could finally start to make connections in terms of who was who and what was happening, which was when the novel really started to climax without having the full story revealed until the very end, and even then there was still plenty left in the dark for the sequel!

I would definitely recommend this book to any lover of crime thriller and also people who like their books on the scientific, spy themed side. If you enjoy the book, you will be pleased to know it is the first in a trilogy, with The Killing Files (The Project Trilogy #2) having just been released.

My Rating: 4 Muffins out of 5

Where To Buy

If you like the sound of the book, here is where you can buy the book (including, but not limited to):

Amazon

The Book Depository

  Cover photo and description taken from Goodreads (view book profile here)

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