August’s Literary Quotes… Discussing Quotes in Literature

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Hello fellow bookworms! It’s Sunday, which means it’s discussion time. This is when I write to think more deeply about books, why we read, and why literature is so important in our lives.
Throughout August, I will be talking about quotations in literature, focusing on why they are so important to us as readers, and what we can do to make the most of these small snippets of literature in our everyday lives. Today’s post is the final instalment in this collection talking about literary quotes, and I will be discussing some quotes I’ve found throughout my August reading, and why they jumped out at me in particular.

“…the distance between stories and real life did not yet seem so great.” – Hollow City

When I was younger, this quote was a lot more true than I feel it is now with children. I felt so connected to stories and believed in fiction a lot more than children these days. Children of this generation are too connected to the real world online and through social media that they forget stories exist; they forget there are so many other alternate universes they can visit in literature. I think it’s so important to establish your own personal distance between reality and stories, and to have a balance between them. After all, stories are used to escape the world we live in.

“Strange, I thought, how you can be living your dreams and your nightmares at the very same time.” – Hollow City

Similar to reading books to escape, you could be struggling in reality, but living the life you wish for whilst reading a book. It’s important to realise that it is possible to be happy and have things to look forward to, as well as be a little bit sad, anxious or worried about things currently happening, or anything in the future. A balance needs to be found between these two emotions, otherwise everything gets a little bit overwhelming! I think this quote sums this feeling up quite nicely.

“Laughing doesn’t make bad things worse any more than crying makes them better…” – Hollow City

This is more of a personally reassuring quote p, as it reminds me it’s okay to feel happy in bad times, and that crying really won’t fix anything, and can sometimes make things feel worse than they are. If crying won’t do any good, then why not laugh instead, because no harm can be done through happiness!

“I am Tessa Grey, and I believe in the importance of stories.” – The Whitechapel Fiend (Tales from the Shadowhunter Academy #3)

I chose this quote because I believe it to be the most true out of all of these. Stories should be seen as important by everyone in their own way, as they allow us to stretch our imaginations. There are so many lessons to be learned in stories that can be applied to everyday life, but they also supply us with a means of escapism, which is also incredibly important for a lot of people. There aren’t many of us who can stand reality 24/7!

“…you wish to be alone with literature all the time.” – Nothing But Shadows (Tales from the Shadowhunter Academy #4)

I loved this when I read it, because it made me think about being alone with literature like being with a person to keep you company. You’re never truly alone when you’re reading, and the idea of being able to ‘be with literature’ all the time sounds like a world I want to be living in!

What do you think of the quotes I can across in my reading this month? Have you come across any good quotes whilst reading recently? Let me know in the comments!

Until next time…

Jade 🙂

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A Few Favourites…Discussing Quotes in Literature

 

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Hello fellow bookworms! It’s Sunday, which means it’s discussion time. This is when I write to think more deeply about books, why we read, and why literature is so important in our lives.

Throughout August, I will be talking about quotations in literature, focusing on why they are so important to us as readers, and what we can do to make the most of these small snippets of literature in our everyday lives. Today’s post will be focused on some of my favourite quotes in literature and why they stand out to me so much, referring to what I've been discussing over the past couple of weeks.

"Before I feared I would lose it, I never loved to read. One does not love breathing."

 

To Kill A Mockingbird

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If anyone asks me, this is my favourite quote from all literature I've read. Ever! From the moment I read it for the first time, it took my breath away, I was so struck by such a beautifully written quote. The last part of the quote really embodies what I love about reading. Books and reading are part of and a natural part of what I do. Without books, I don't know where I would be. However, I wouldn't go as far as to say I've never loved to read, but you get the gist!

"To really be a nerd, she'd decided, you had to prefer fictional worlds to the real one."

 

Fangirl

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I feel like this quote isn't talking about stereotypical of nerds collectively, but book nerds in particular. A lot of people read to escape, so it's key to prefer the worlds you're reading about to feel the true effects of escapism. Another reason I love this quote is because it reminds me I fictional worlds I can go to if I'm not keen of reality at times. I have another quote in a bit which has a similar affect.

"My thoughts are stars I cannot fathom into constellations."

 

The Fault in Our Stars

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As a creative person, this quote is very important to me. I often have a brain full of whirring thoughts and ideas I can't quite put together, and this helps me to realise that the feeling is quite normal. It's also really nice to think of thoughts as stars, far away from being physically tangible, but still a spark of an idea in the darkness, especially when those thoughts are few and far between, as they often can be.

"Whether you come back page by page or by the big screen, Hogwarts will always be there to welcome you home."

 

J.K. Rowling

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This quote isn't necessarily from literature, but it is an important quote for me, I couldn't not include it! Like the Fangirl quote, it reminds me I have a second home and, if I'm not really enjoying reality, I have somewhere else to go. I can visit Hogwarts whenever I feel the need to. As readers, I think we are all very grateful to authors to have such an incredible world to escape to and be welcomed into.

"One must always be careful of books, and what is inside them, for words have the power to change us."

 

Clockwork Angel

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This final quote proves that books really do have a lot of influence over what we do, how we act, and how we conduct ourselves in society. I don't know about you, but I often take on small traits from characters I love in a book (*cough* Hermione Granger *cough*). We can sometimes underestimate the immense power that words have over us, and how much they can affect us emotionally. Book appear to just be words of a page, but they can be so much more (scientifically proven when we sob over fictional character's deaths!)

I'd love to know what your favourite quotes from book are, and why you love them so much!

Until next time…

Jade 🙂

P.S I have hand cut paper bookmarks with the first two quotes on available in my Etsy shop!

What’s Comin’ Will Come… Discussing Quotations in Literature

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Hello fellow bookworms! It’s Sunday, which means it’s discussion time. This is when I write to think more deeply about books, why we read, and why literature is so important in our lives.

Throughout August, I will be talking about quotations in literature, focusing on why they are so important to us as readers, and what we can do to make the most of these small snippets of literature in our everyday lives. Today’s post will be focused on my favourite quote from a book series that the majority of the bookworm population have read, enjoyed and will cherish forever… Harry Potter!

Hang on, what did I talk about last week?

So last Sunday I talked about why quotes from literature are so important to us, and how they differ from generally inspiring quotes, as well as how quotes stand out to us when we’re reading, and how we keep track of our favourite quotes. This week, I wanted to share with you one of my favourite quotes from literature, and what it means to me, and explain how we can use our favourite quotes in everyday life.

Who doesn’t love a bit of Harry Potter?!

I thought it would be a good idea to apply what I discussed last week to one of my all time favourite quotes from the Harry Potter series, and explain why it is my favourite quote. This quote is…

What’s comin’ will come, an’ we’ll meet it when it does.

– Hagrid, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Who said it?

Hagrid is known in the Potter books for being slightly dopey, but a very lovable character, but when Voldemort returns, it’s almost like he feels a wave of responsibility for certain things. Of course, he is the keeper of keys for the castle, but he feels an overwhelming sense of protection, towards the trio in particular, but also an urge to guard the castle even more than before with evil in the midst once again. This quote is more than reassurance for Harry, Ron and Hermione, but also for himself, to know that he is a strong and powerful faculty member of Hogwarts who will do whatever he can to protect the students.

The meaning behind the quote

It’s quite a self-explanatory quote- whatever happens in the future is going to happen. We can do as much as possible to change it, but most is inevitable, and we just have to deal with it when whatever ‘it’ is finally arrives.

I have seen quotes similar to this, worded slightly differently, before, and anyone can take inspiration and meaning from them, but what I love about being able to draw meaning from a book that means so much to me, is it’s context. General inspirational quotes you find on Pinterest are great (don’t get me wrong, I have a board or two with a collection of them), but what they lack is the context behind them. Literary quotes have several layers of context, such as who says the quote, and what is happening at the time. The context behind this quote is the fact that Voldemort has just returned to power, which means Hogwarts is in an extremely vulnerable position, as are all students and staff within it. With the risk of battle right around the corner, this quote is perfectly placed towards the end of Goblet of Fire, to provide the characters and us as readers, a sense of reassurance that, even though we know what’s coming, all we can do is prepare as best we can and tackle the problem with heads held high.

Why does this quote mean so much to me?

There are an abundance of quotes throughout the Harry Potter series that speak to people in different ways; it is well renowned for quotes that readers live by. The story itself is full of important life lessons and morals, but it’s this quote in particular that really speaks to me for many reasons. I often (by often, I mean constantly) worry about the future. I want to have the ability to see what’s coming, so I can change it by acting accordingly in the present. I use this quote as a mantra, telling myself that I can only do so much to change the future, and what cannot be changed is going to happen, whether I like it not. I use the second part of the quote to prepare myself, and to make sure I’m ready to ‘meet it when it does’ eventually come my way.

Similar literary quotes

While this quote is my favourite from Harry Potter, I have found other quotes that speak to me in very similar ways. One of those is from Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them (which is kind of coincidental…), when Newt Scamander says…

My philosophy is worrying means you suffer twice.

– Newt Scamander, Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them

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and another one from The Fault In Our Stars…

Nothing to be gained by worrying between now and then. And yet I still worried.

– Hazel Grace, The Fault In Our Stars

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The reason I wanted to talk about Hagrid’s quote instead of these two though, is because you have to read a bit deeper into it to find the meaning. Newt’s and Hazel’s quotes both state worry in the text, whereas Hagrid’s doesn’t, and you have to search around to find the worry within the text, because it is so well contained. This, again, is down to the context. Hagrid doesn’t want to come across worried to the students, therefore he contains his worry in a more positive way. This is what I really like about this quote; while it embodies a feeling of worry, it is displayed in a slightly happier light.

So that’s my favourite quote from the entire Harry Potter series, I hope you enjoyed reading about my (extensive) reasoning why I like this particular quote, and if you read this far without getting a bit bored (I’m sorry, I rambled!), I would love to know what your favourite Harry Potter quote is and why you chose it!

Until next time…

Jade 🙂

The Importance of Quotations in Literature

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Hello fellow bookworms! It’s Sunday, which means it’s discussion time. This is when I write to think more deeply about books, why we read, and why literature is so important in our lives. As you may have discovered a pattern in my discussion posts, I like to have a discussion ‘theme’ for a month, because I feel it allows me to go into more depth about a specific topic without boring you all by putting it in one massively long post you probably won’t read.

Throughout August, I will be talking about quotations in literature, focusing on why they are so important to us as readers, and what we can do to make the most of these small snippets of literature in our everyday lives. Today’s post will be focused on what quotations mean to us as readers and why they are such an important part of the reader community…

What makes quotations from literature so important?

I find it difficult to express how much literary quotes mean to me. If you are familiar with the theory of horcruxes, it’s almost like taking a piece of a book and keeping it somewhere safe in your mind, so the book can continue to live, even when you’re not reading it.
This question could also be ‘why are quotes from literature different from inspiring quotes in general?’. Most quotes in our ‘collections’ are from the books that we’ve read and enjoyed, and they become a record of those books, so we are able to remember and cherish the stories through a snippet of literature. These quotes come from people who know how to do wondrous things with words, which means they quotes can also be read metaphorically and have more than one meaning, which adds depth to them that generalised quotes don’t tend to have. When we read a book, we are subconsciously on the look out for sentences or groups of words that come to life and bring meaning, whether it’s a well known quote we’ve heard before, or just a section that really resonates with us personally. These quotes then become a great comfort to us in times when we aren’t feeling our best, or need encouragement or motivation. If they come from our most treasured books, they become even more special. Those quotes that may not have been picked up by others, or are less popular among other readers, can be a lot more personal, and can seem like we have something special and unique. These literary quotes give us hope, they share morals and give insight into a world beyond what we know. Not only do these quotes have metaphorical depth, but they hold imagination that only readers can see, and allow us access to unknown places. They are fictional, but can be so much more!

How can you spot a quote when you’re reading?

If you’re reading a popular book, or something you have read before, you may be familiar with the quotes, and therefore spot them straight away when reading. However, if you’re reading a book that you aren’t familiar with, you may have to search around a bit more. I tend to find it sends a strange vibe through me, like I’ve struck a piece of gold in a mine full of words. It gives me the urge to sit back and think about what I’ve just read and think, or write it down immediately to make sure I don’t forget it, and so I can look back on it later. These are usually sentences or groups of sentences that resonate with you, because of something you have or are experiencing in life, which you draw wisdom from, or just words that are so well written they are just too beautiful not to savour.

Why and how do we collect our favourite quotes?

We collect the quotes we find in books to look back on them and remember the stories, and what the quotes meant at the time of reading. Maybe they mean something different now. So how do we go about making sure we have a record of these quotes, because let’s be honest, we are not all superhuman and cannot store hundreds of quotations in our brain! Personally, I use Goodreads to a keep a rough record of the quotes I find, but not all quotes are on Goodreads, and it isn’t easy to find them even when you have liked them. For the month of August, I am setting myself a task, or challenge of sorts. I am going to be keeping a ‘Note the Quote’ diary, writing down anything I read that I want to keep hold of for any reason. I will be aiming for at least 5 quotes per book, and at the end of the month, I will share all the quotes I found, and why I chose to write them down.
I hope you enjoyed reading, and if you have anything to add about why you feel literary quotations are important, please feel free to share in the comments!

Until next time…

Jade 🙂